Friday, 12 October 2012

Novelty books; Part two

Last week; bird showcases, Jimmy Jumbo, Dinah, Jum and Mac, Willie Wombat, Before 1066 and all that, living picture book with magic glasses and a treasure hunt. View here

This week painting and drawing and things to make.


The Scissorbill Bird by Louise Selworthy. The title of this made no sense until I realised the bird’s eye, and beak is fashioned from a pair of scissors. The delights of cut-our paper craft with colour and black/white illustrations. Published by the Dryad Press in 1947. Birds and Beasts chalking Book cover illustration by Gilbert Rumbold. Twelve pages to be completed with chalk (all clean and untouched) two pages of colour illustrations to copy. Published by P. M. productions, London c1950. I can’t understand why this is still unused – my fingers itch to start colouring every time I look at it! My drawing Book a book for chalks or paints. Another undated book but probably 1950s. Thick board pages with colour illustrations to copy - giraffe, train, cat, mouse, bat, ball, goose, house. 

 The Toyland painting and tracing book a painting book for boys and girls. Published by BB Ltd.


Molly B. Thomson the Rainbow Paint Book Hardback book with dust jacket. 10 x 8 inches with 36 pages. 16 colour illustrations of fairies and elves. Opposite each illustration is the same picture to colour, three of these have been partly or fully completed. No date c1940s? 

Now something for the boys:
Press-out Express freight train action press out model - easy to make - no glue required, published by Bancroft in 1965. Make a model Samurai Warrior complete with authentic armour, including crested helmet and two swords. Read about the history and daily life of a Samurai warrior with detailed descriptions of fighting equipment. Published in 1991 by Simon and Schuster. 

and the girls:
Sue the air hostess cut out doll dressing book complete with story published by Peter Haddock, c1975. Four pages of colour outfits, including Sue’s uniform. Sue the air hostess is printed on the back cover waiting to be cut out and dressed.

A few more things to make;
The swing boat toy model story book published by Amex Co c1940s. Billy and Myrtle really want to visit the fair but mummy has a headache, and the fair is a really noisy place. So what do they do instead? Build a model fair ride of course! 

Our village shop published by Heinemann in 1983.  The past comes to life as you cut out and assemble this delightful model of an old-fashioned village shop. Our Village Shop is a red-brick, open-fronted store, complete with counters, a sub-post-office, a wide variety of provisions ranging from fruit and vegetables to rugs and laundry baskets, and even shop assistants and customers. The book also contains memories of a village shop, a true account of what it was like to work in such a store. Jean Sawyer, who worked in her grandfather's village, recalls it all in vivid detail. Devised and painted by Faith Jaques.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs a model tableau  with story, instructions and diagrams. Published by Litor publishers, Birmingham, 1956. I think the artist’s name is ‘Carlo Tora’ but it’s difficult to read the signature.

 Thanks to everyone who commented last week. I hope you are enjoyed this trip down memory lane.  

All the featured books are now sold, thank you for your interest.



Update July 2016: March House books closed on my retirement in 2015, but I do still blog here at March of Time Books and always appreciate your visit. 



18 comments:

  1. Thestuffofsuccess12 October 2012 at 14:40

    Following you back (via book blogs) - TheStuffofSuccess. Have a great day. Athena

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  2. Oh my gosh - these are s cool! I would have loved snow white's house when i was a kid, my paperdolls would have been happy, too, LOL!

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  3. barbaraannefisher12 October 2012 at 15:09

    Thanks Athena, looking forward to your posts!

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  4. barbaraannefisher12 October 2012 at 15:18

    Hi Joleene, Snow White’s house is my favourite. You have no idea how much I want to play with it! I feel like a kid in a sweet shop most days.

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  5. These are so wonderful! I love them all, I get so excited when ever I find things like this! When looking at yours I am feeling a bit of that same excitement and I didn't even have to leave the house! I have one sitting on my table called Adventure's of a Brownie by Milo Winter. It's called a paint-book. I need to get photos and I will soon post it on my blog. Loved the comments you left about the goblins! Have a great weekend Barbara! ~Diane~

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  6. barbaraannefisher12 October 2012 at 19:28

    Thanks Diane. I’m already looking forward to finding out more about the adventures of a Brownie – I love things like that.
    I really enjoyed your post about goblins. The music and illustrations just went together so well. I shall be back for another look shortly!

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  7. I can also never understand how anyone could own a book like any of these as a child and not use them. I would dive in straight away as soon as anything was given to me! I like the shop the most (and Snow White second). I had two books similar to the shop when I was small - one was of a modern house and garden, the other was of the circus. I can still see them in my mind although its decades since I played with them.

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  8. I would have loved the Rainbow Paint book and the Snow White one when I was little. I still think they are fun! I also loved playing with paper dolls and would have liked to have had the shop book and extras. When I got books with extras I read them and played with them until they fell apart. I always love to see what finds you have waiting for us to see!

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  9. barbaraannefisher14 October 2012 at 11:25

    Hi Sharon, I like those two, but I’m also longing to dress “Sue the air hostess”!
    It’s amazing how the mind retains pictures (and songs). I can never remember by eight times table but the words of away in a manger, and Good King Wenceslas are indelibly printed.

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  10. barbaraannefisher14 October 2012 at 11:39

    Hello Stephanie, They are great aren’t they? I could happily play with them but it somehow feels wrong to ‘spoil’ them. I certainly wouldn’t have felt like that when I was a child, I wish I could go back in time and take them with me!

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  11. These are wonderful Barbara, thank you for sharing them with us. I never fail to smile when I view the beautiful covers of the books you find and post. I really like the one called The Scissorbill Bird.

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  12. barbaraannefisher17 October 2012 at 00:59

    Thanks Lindsay it's really nice to know you are enjoying them.

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  13. Hi Barbara

    I love them all. I really liked playing with the cut out paper doll books when I was young.
    I recognised Molly B Thomson illustrator. She's done some beautiful illustrations.

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  14. barbaraannefisher17 October 2012 at 09:20

    Hi Michelle, I had a feeling you were another 'paper doll girl'! I agree about Molly B Thomson, she does the most beautiful illustrations.

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  15. barbaraannefisher18 October 2012 at 19:09

    Hi Leanne, I think so! Thanks for calling in.

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  16. I remember loving these kinds of books when I was growing up. They made me feel like I was accomplishing something.

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  17. barbaraannefisher23 October 2012 at 18:24

    Hello Donna, I know just what you mean - I felt like that too.

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I really appreciate your comment. Thank you!
Barbara xx

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