Monday, 5 October 2015

A Book from my Bookshelf - The Cassell’s Annual For Boys and Girls 1914

I know lots of you enjoying seeing images from my vintage book collection and so this week I'm going to share the delightful Cassell's Annual for Boys and Girls. It is often difficult to date these old annuals, but I had no problem with this one because the publisher kindly printed MCMXIV on the title page. If you struggle with Roman Numerals as I sometimes do there is a handy Roman numeral converter here or here 


Tip – if you are trying to put a date to an undated book, one way is to visit COPAC – a searchable catalogue which provides free access to the merged online catalogues of many major research libraries. You can often verify bibliographic information this way, but a simpler way is to take a good look at the book itself.  In the case of the Cassell's Annual the publisher offered 100 prizes in a Grand Painting Competition which closed on the 20th January 1915 (or for Colonial readers the 2nd March 1915). So it makes sense to assume it was published in 1914 in plenty of time for Christmas.

I've been spoilt for choice when it comes to images to share. The title page states there are nearly two hundred colour pictures. I hope you enjoy the ones I’ve chosen.  


The Adventures of Edward the Red Teddy Bear - The Aeroplane Wish 
with illustrations by Frank Hart.
Edward the Red Teddy Bear frowned and said, " If we'd lived about a hundred million years ago we might have met a fairy or something that would have given us wishes. Nowadays, we can't meet fairies because there don't happen to by any, but I don't see why we shouldn't have the wishes. Suppose that I and you and the Dutch Doll decide in our minds that we will take it in turns to have a wish, and that the two of us who aren't wishing will promise very faithfully to help the one who is wishing until his wish is quite finished!"


Another Frank Hart illustration for a story called The Suffragette Wish.
So they followed Nancy the Dutch Doll out into the crowded streets. When she found herself quite in the street, Nancy wondered very much in her mind what kind of things suffragettes did. And the only thing she could think of was to bite a policeman!


Mabel Lucie Attwell illustrates a poem by Margaret O. Carpenter.
I wrote a letter to my love - I used my very longest pen:
I sealed the letter with a heart and gave it kisses ten.
But oh, I let it lie about before I posted it, and so
the fairies stole it right away - I cried all night, I know.
Next day, with Podge, my darling dog, I walked a most tremendous way
Until I found the Toadstool Town, where naughty fairies play.
They laughed, and stared, and winked, and sneered, and made such horrid rude grimaces.
But I could tell they were the thieves by looking at their faces.
I said, "You've got my letter there! Now do be good and give it up."
But they played pranks which frightened me, and angered Podge the pup.
He made a rush, did Podge, and growled, and barked so fierce a "Bow-wow-wow!"
They fled, and left my note behind - I'll run and post it now!


Arthur Rackham provides numerous illustrations for several stories, including this one 
(The Two Great Pachas).
Many years ago there lived a famous monarch of Arabia named Ali Pacha, who ruled over a vast empire in the East. He had won so many battles and was so fearless and wise a man that he was known as "The Great Pacha."

The following illustrations are by Stuart-Barker - I haven't come across the illustrator before, but I think the images are enchanting. 
Lost!

Found!


Abraham Huggs's Book of Drugs by Olaf Baker, artist not credited. 
Now it happened that, in the same town, there lived a very old and most disrespectable person called Abraham Huggs. He lived quite alone except for his owl Alexander, and his wild black cat Sputtles. A spitting, fighting, swearing creature was Sputtles, and not another cat or dog dared to come near the place. And Alexander wan't much better, and used to mope at day and hoot at night, and make himself generally disagreeable.

Belinda screamed with terror illustration by Florence Hardy
Then the Teddy Bear sized Belinda and set her on his toboggan. Just as he did so there was a dreadful growling, and twenty huge bears rushed out of the wood. The Teddy Bear started the toboggan down the steep slope of the hill. The Big Bears rushed after it, growling furiously. Belinda could hear them close behind, and screamed with terror. But the toboggan went faster and faster...


The Clock Illustration and poem by E. Dorothy Rees.
Tick-tock! What says the clock?
Bed-time it must be.
Take a light, say "good-night,"
And come upstairs with me!

Is that the time? Goodness I must away but I just have time to show you a picture of the book spine - irresistible don't you think? 


Thanks for your visit. I hope you enjoyed a peek inside this beautiful book.


38 comments:

  1. What a lovely cover and the pages are very attractive. We need more books like this today! :)

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    1. Hi Linda, you are not wrong! Thanks for calling in, Barbara.

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  2. All of them are charming! The Stuart-Barker illustrations are very like Rackham's style, though the example you give here (of Rackham) is unlike any illustrations I've ever seen of his. Just proves he was very talented and diverse.

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    1. Hello Bish, I chose that particular Rackham illustration because it is so different to his usual style. If it wasn’t for his signature, I would have assumed it was done by someone else. As you say it shows how talented he was.

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  3. What a wonderful book. You are right, the spine is irresistible and I love the cover ... always had a soft spot for Golly's as my maiden name was Robertson! M x

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    1. Hello Marina, how wonderful & with a name like Robertson, how could you not like them.

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  4. Such a delightful post. I adore that bedtime poem so much that it might well replace the traditional 'night-night, sleep tight and don't let the bedbugs bite' that I still say should niece #1 (26) and nephew (now 26 and 22) stay over.

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    1. How funny Tracy I still say that to my grown-up grandsons, and it's even funnier when our son (aged 41) says it to us!

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  5. Thank you so much for sharing again from your collection, Barbara!! I always love Mabel Lucie Atwell illustrations - the poem is very sweet as well!!

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    1. Hello Teressa, it was my absolute pleasure, thank you for taking the time to read the post. Barbara.

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  6. You always have the most interesting posts and this one is no exception. A part of KidLit history some of us would never have known about otherwise. Thanks for your generous sharing, Barbara.

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    1. Hi Alex, as I said to Teressa (above) it really is my pleasure. It feels like sharing my favourite things with a group of very good friends. Thank you for calling in and leaving a comment, Barbara

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  7. The illustrations are marvellous!

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    1. I’m so please you enjoyed them Darlene.

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  8. I had that book. I remember it well, and what I did with it. In my defence I was only five but it involved a roller skate and a hill and resulted in two very badly scraped knees. That'll learn me.

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    1. Roger how could you! Having said that I must admit I did much the same thing as a child, although the destruction usually involved scissors rather than roller skates!

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  9. Wonderful post, loved the illustrations.

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  10. I find Stuart Barker's illustrations enchanting, too, Barbara. And that book spine. How clever! Somehow the scene from Book of Drugs is familiar ~ having a nose in a book and dropping books everywhere.

    It's always a joy looking through the artwork on your blog!

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    1. Hello Claudine, perhaps you could think about doing something like that on one of your books – it’s like taking a quick peek inside and wanting to see more.
      I really enjoyed your Fox’s Garden post, you do find the nicest books. x

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  11. The quality of the illustrations, the happiness, the imagination and whimsy, these things are still in books of today, but what I love about these books is the feeling of escape that every child should experience. Today's books include too much reality for kids, making an attempt to EXPLAIN too many reality issues that I think need to be dealt with elsewhere. These books are the perfect getaway to a place I wish existed. LOVELY CHOICES my friend!

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    1. Hello Anita,
      I’m sure those places do exist. They may only be inside our heads, but they are still there.
      It is so sweet of you to keep visiting me even though you are no longer blogging. I do call in to see you on Instagram from time to time, and I’m thoroughly enjoying all your photos.

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  12. Dear Barbara, irresistible it is. Such a gem you have. Thank you so much for letting us have a little peek at it. Love the illustrations. It's always a delight to see your beautiful books even if it is only a small peek.
    I did finally manage to see the little video in the last post. There is something not right with our internet connection lately hence I could not see the video fully. It is beautiful .

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    1. Dear Shashi, make me laugh you did! My family and friends are probably sick to death with me banging on about books so it is lovely to share with people who appreciate them. There are so many images it was difficult to choose just a few, but the post would have been a mile long if I had taken any more pics!
      Thanks for having another try with the video, I think it is gorgeous.

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  13. What a beautiful fun book! Thanks for the tips on determining the age of a book, should come in handy.

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    1. Hi Marcia, I do hope so. Thanks for leaving a comment, Barbara.

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  14. Oh that is a lovely book to have and I especially like the Mabel Lucy Attwell illustration, always my favourite. Xx

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    1. Hi Sue, I feel lucky to own it and even luckier being able to share some of the images.xx

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  15. Wonder if Florence Hardy had just read Ethan Fromm? LOL Love the poem and the pictures.

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    1. Hello Eve, that hadn’t occurred to me, but now you mention it its perfectly possible. How funny – perhaps she had just read the bit about the sledge and the elm tree!

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  16. What a fascinating glimpse into the wonders of childhood a century ago! Of course, aeroplanes and Suffragettes were very topical back then. I'm sure there could be some interesting interpretations of the Dutch Doll, Golly and RED Teddy being brought to order by the police these days ;) - but the policemen look a friendly bunch. And I've love to know more about Abraham Hugg's Book of Drugs ...

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    1. Hi Sue, absolutely! I did wonder if anyone would pick up on the colour of the teddy. The picture makes me smile, but I can image it might cause a little consternation these days. Your comment about Abraham Hugg’s gives me an idea for another post, watch this space…

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  17. The book is in such a wonderful condition for its age. I love looking at old books like that. The illustrations are beautiful, where as today's illustrations always seem to be the same as each other.

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    1. Good morning Nikki-ann, I purchased it from an auction several years ago and paid far too much but the condition was just so perfect, and it is a beautiful. I’ve never regretted owning it, but I know I would have regretted leaving it behind.

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  18. The illustrations are fabulous! They condition of the book is exceptional and I can imagine reading through this one must be a delight. :) The spine is awesome! I love it. Thanks for sharing something from your collection with us.

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    1. Hi Stephanie, the condition was the thing that drew me to it, and I’m very glad it did. Some of the content is not particularly PC these days, but I love it none the less.

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  19. And THIS is how you and I became friends,my dear Barbara!! I recall those first emails we shared,after I wrote to enquire about one of your items which was for sale,after visiting your 'shop' so many times in the past, when we commented on just how very many things we share in common;mainly our love of these old and antique illustrated children's books,and our beloved dogs!! I adore all of my similar annuals to THIS one of yours,where the poems within their covers are as delicious as the stories, and the pictures which were always done by the Golden Age artists whose works these days are so well known and loved by anyone with a soul!! I was horrified to find that you were indeed retiring from the shop side of things a mere 2 weeks after my first email,but I did manage ro get a few treasures from you at the much reduced prices you were letting them go for!!! I would have loved to have bought SO many more,but the timing was just not good for me.
    It does not truly matter though,as the bonus which is our friendship,means so much more than the books ever could;and I do,after all,have literally 1000's of of book treasures to enjoy whenever I feel inclined to do so!!!
    I remember many moons ago,when colour-copying first became available,I chose a stunning colour plate of a gorgeously attired Bunny painting Eggs and had just a few copies made to use in a Window Dressing job I did!! If I had a dollar for every time someone asked if they were for sale,I would be quite wealthy!! I did not sell any of them,but did give one of them,as a gift, to the owner of the shop who had 2 very small children at the time and I kept the others for family members! These days with personal scanners in use,we are able to copy ANY of our favourite images,so that we can share,while not destroying our treasures!! It is such a treat ,as they are all out of copyright now and so we are not doing anything that we should not be doing!!! It has made my card-making so delightful over the years! As for the RED teddy....Steiff's famous early Teddy Bear named Alfonso,which about 5 years back sold for OVER US$30.000, was Bright RED!!! I have to say I LOVE the illustration in your Cassell's annual!!! I actually find that the Cassell's were some of the best of the annuals containing colour plates!! I only have a very few of them,but your sharing yours with everyone,has made me feel like I am in the room enjoying this one with you!
    Thank You Barbara,for all the joy you so generously share with all of us out here in the big wide world!! You are such a gem.Many smiles,Jules

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    1. Hello Julie
      Thank you for your lovely comment & your friendship.
      I’ve just found a picture of the Steiff Teddy Bear online, and he certainly looks a lot like the one in the annual. I must find out more! Thank you so much for the information, I learn something new from you all the time. I have never thought about photocopying and sharing the images, but it’s a lovely idea. I’ve bought (and written!) my Christmas cards for this year but it’s something I could think about doing next year. I’ve never been so far advanced with my Christmas planning. I don’t want to have tons and tons to do when the family arrives because I want time to enjoy their company.
      We are off to visit my sister and brother in law today they moved into their new home a few weeks ago we will share a bottle of bubbly and take a look around. I hope you have a lovely rest of the week Julie, thank you again for your sweet words. Barbara x

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I really appreciate your comment. Thank you!
Barbara xx

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